Google Continues to Prove it Can't be Trusted!

Google Continues to Prove it Can't be Trusted!

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After Google released its new Google Photos app in May, Walt Mossberg, Co-Executive Editor of Re/code, reminded his readers that “using it requires you to trust a company whose business model is tracking your actions and selling ads.” The fact is, Google is addicted to the intimate and personal details that you capture every day in your photos, videos, and emails. So, is it wise to trust that Google will keep personal information private when they make money by selling it to advertisers? The answer is obviously, “No!” And Google continues to prove it can’t be trusted.

Nashville Business Journal’s David Arnott recently discovered that Google continues to collect personal photos even after the Google Photos app is deleted from Android devices. Shortly after it was launched, Arnott downloaded and tried the app, but wasn’t convinced. So he deleted it from his phone. Then, five weeks later, he decided to look for interesting updates. When he downloaded the app a second time he made a shocking discovery. He wrote…

“There they were, hundreds of photos I’d taken of my wife, my daughter, and me, grouped together by Google’s facial-recognition technology in the company’s Photos app, all snapped over the course of a little more than a month. The problem was, I’d deleted all of those pictures, and most distressing, I didn’t even have the Google Photos app on my phone.”

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Can you imagine? What a violation of privacy! Arnott reached out to Google for an explanation. Google replied in an email that “The backup was as intended.” How creepy is that? Arnott was told that if he wanted to stop the backup, he would have to change his setting in Google Play Services.

Google has since issued numerous public statements indicating that they are committed to resolving the issue. For example, the Company told TechCrunch, “This is something we are committed to resolving. We are working to make the messaging clearer as well as provide users who uninstall the Photos app an easy way to also disable backup.” But why did Google intentionally make it so difficult to shut down Google’s automatic (and secret) backup in the first place? Again, the answer is obvious. Because Google is more committed to violating our privacy in order to make money than protecting our digital content. They simply can’t be trusted to keep our precious memories safe and secure.

Whether it’s Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, or Dropbox, the bottom line is that these companies do not preserve important memories in a way that ensures the content is private, secure and accessible for generations.

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